What Are Thermosetting Plastics?

Introduction to Epoxy Paint – Thermosetting Plastics

Introduction to Epoxy Paint – Thermosetting Plastics

Definition, general risks and health hazards.

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Methodical Risk Assessment

Methodical Risk Assessment

Identifying risks, preventing and avoiding them.

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Documentation and Inventory

Documentation and Inventory

Risk assessments as well as decided and implemented measures to reduce risk should be documented before a task is initiated.

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Handling and Safety Instructions

Handling and Safety Instructions

Before any work with epoxy components, local handling and safety instructions based on risk assessment must be issued, and communicated to those who will carry out the work.

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Step 1 of 31 minute read

What Are Thermosetting Plastics?

Hull painting

Thermosetting plastics are polymer materials that irreversibly cure. This means they become hard and cannot melt or become liquid again. Curing is initiated through a chemical reaction i.e. two-part epoxy, through heat (generally above 200 degrees Celsius) or by irradiation, such as electron beam processing. The most common thermosetting plastic on board ships is two-part epoxy paint.

Please note that this course will only cover the handling of epoxy paint. Regarding the handling of any other thermoplastics on board, please contact your employer.

AFS 2014:43 amends to and replaces the former AFS 2011:19

Steering Documents Applicable

Workplace handling of chemicals, such as any thermosetting plastics, is controlled by the Swedish Work Environment Authority (Arbetsmiljöverket) in steering document AFS 2011:19: Chemical Hazards in the Working Environment (Kemiska arbetsmiljörisker). Arbetsmiljöverket requires anyone who handles more than 500 grams of thermosetting plastic components to follow the rules set out in AFS 2011:19.