Human Error and Learning from Mistakes

Why Is Risk Assessment Important?

Why Is Risk Assessment Important?

This lesson will explain to you how to calculate the likelihood of an accident, and the seriousness of its consequences. You will also be introduced to the ALARP triangle.

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Four Steps of Risk Assessment

Four Steps of Risk Assessment

This lesson will take you through the four steps of risk assessment. You will learn about the Take Five program which will be a good tool for you to use when assessing risks.

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Step 1 of 41 minute read

Human Error and Learning from Mistakes

Studies show that approximately 60% to 80% of all accidents happen due to human error. Any accident or incident that is due to human error is one that can be prevented. One way to prevent accidents is to analyze the risks involved before performing a task.

For the most important operations onboard, there are procedures to follow. These procedures have been developed through risk assessment and risk management. You should always follow the outlined procedures for all the tasks you perform onboard, but a formal risk assessment must be carried out before performing any task onboard that is not already covered by an existing risk assessment.

Learning from Mistakes – a Cornerstone of Safety

Making mistakes and learning from them is a cornerstone of safety. It’s one of the best ways to continually improve a company's safety management system because it involves real problems. When incorporated into the daily work onboard, lessons learned from real situations can prevent accidents from happening again in the same way.

Whenever an accident occurs, performing a thorough root cause analysis (RCA) usually reveals how that kind of accident can be avoided in the future. In a strong safety culture, accidents — and more importantly, near-accidents — are reported without fear of embarrassment or negative reactions. Once reported, accidents are analyzed, and improvements are made.